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Rights Treading

17 Jan

Rights Treading

A new addition to “the talk”

26 Nov

 

I found this article in Time that argues that doctors should discuss emergency contraception with their teen patients. Currently, there is no data showing that the discussion of emergency contraception will increase sexual activity among teen. They also say that teens lack impulse control and are not always careful about using birth control. By giving teens an advanced prescription for emergency contraception, doctors are hoping to lower the number of teen pregnancies. Plan B is available over the counter but personally, I don’t think I would feel comfortable asking for it at a pharmacy but a prescription would be more private. The article does not advocate giving young teenagers a prescription but starting to talk at an earlier age, around the time of the “birds and the bees” talk and making it an option for sexually active teens. Should doctors be allowed to discuss emergency contraception with their patient, even with those who would never use it?

Judge: Hobby Lobby Must Offer the Morning After Pill

20 Nov

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A judge has decreed that Hobby Lobby must provide the morning after pill as a part of its employee insurance plan. In this article provided by abcnews.go,com it is stated that Hobby Lobby is not a religious organization, so it must provide the morning after pill to it’s employees. The owners are religious and are fighting the new health care law. Where do you think the line should be drawn? Should employers have the right to pick and choose what insurance should be covered?

A Human Right

18 Nov

The UN recently declared that birth control is now a universal human right. Women deciding when they have children and how many directly effects their quality of life.  The UN study reports:

“Studies have shown that investing in family planning helps reduce poverty, improve health, promote gender equality, enable adolescents to finish their schooling, and increase labourforce participation.

When a woman is able to exercise her reproductive rights, she is more able to benefit from her other rights, such as the right to education. The results are higher incomes, better health for her and her children and greater decision-making power for her, both in the household and the community.”

I’m very happy that the UN has acknowledged the importance of birth control access, but real change can’t come until society changes. One example the report cited is that the Catholic churches influence in the Phillapines has completely prevented poor women from getting birth control. Lower income countries also suffer access problems. Hopefully, family planning will be more affordable and accessible as time passes.

Akin Defeated by a…Woman

7 Nov

This article talks about Rep. Todd Akin losing to Sen. Claire McCaskill. In his concession speech Akin compared himself to someone with cancer. I wonder after his statements about rape how many people are really going to buy his “poor me” act. Is it wrong that I am actually happy he lost?

“The Choice on Choice”

12 Oct

President Obama posted this on his twitter earlier and it got me thinking about about the fact that birth control and abortion are still major issues in American politics. It’s 30 years later and Roe v. Wade is still controversial! In our modern society I think this is just ludicrous! No matter my own personal views on abortion, I think that we live in a democratic society and we should not impose our own views on everyone. Not everyone in America is religious or against abortion. They should have the right to choose! Furthermore, I’m tired of these social issues being at the top of political agenda when we should be focusing on fixing the economy! I’m trying to give Romney and Ryan a fair chance and really consider their policies and plans. However, it’s things like this that just affirm that I am supporting the right candidates. What are your thoughts on this? Should these social issues be a major topic of discussion?

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It’s the Law…

9 Oct

Check out Lady Parts Justice online. Liz Winstead talks about how since 2011 there have been hundreds of laws passed that strip away women’s rights to privacy and healthcare.

 

Birth Control Controversy Hits NYC Schools

30 Sep

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/video/birth-control-controversy-hits-nyc-schools-17309946

I am a bit on the offense that the schools would suggest such a movement. I understand trying to curb the outbreak of teen pregnancy, but this approach seems a bit accepting of an action that young teens should be cautious of. I don’t think schools have exhausted all of their possibilities when it comes to this epidemic. It’s wrong to administer a drug that for one we have no idea how it will affect the bodies of these young teens and two even with the permission of the parents just doesn’t seem ethical. Young people misinterpret a lot these days, and I agree with one of the parents in the video when he said what example and message are we sending to the teenage population, that sex is ok and that you will not be held accountable for your actions?

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Feminism

25 Sep

I went on a random youtube video binge, and I came across a video of Gloria Steinam talking about the ‘feminazi’ and the degradation of the term ‘feminist.’
I have come to associate feminism as an extreme movement, but this video made me wonder why. I always said that I was just feminist when it came to reproductive rights. But I still believe in Equal Pay for Equal Work and having more women in higher offices and corporations. I feel like maybe I should own the term.

On Sex Education and Latinas

20 Sep

Lisa brought up sex education and I started preaching on a tangent, so I’m making a post about it.

I’d say easier access to birth control would help to correct the larger part of a massive problem, but for any progress made to be sustained we need sex education that extends beyond abstinence and that it needs to be offered bilingually. For the largest minority in the U.S., Latinos, birth control isn’t the silver bullet with Latinas, it’s better sex education AND birth control.

I personally can attest to this in Latino culture. My father is 100 percent Mexican and a Pastor. I attended a Christian school through elementary and middle school. My mother’s attempt at sex education was taking me to a Cracker Barrel (for breakfast…appetite eliminated) and flipping through an illustrated book she borrowed from the church. My sex education was essentially reading a borrowed copy of Cosmopolitan magazine under the covers with a flashlight at night (PITY ME). Sex does not exist in the Latino household.

According to the Pew Hispanic Center Study,  Latino parents aren’t discussing sex or birth control. “Just over half of Latino youths (53 percent) report that their parents talked to them about sex when they were growing up. A smaller share—39 percent—report that their parents talked to them about birth control.” Young Hispanics are having about the same amount of sex as other kids their age, but for some reason Latinas end up pregnant far more often than other races and ethnicity. I draw a parallel between the lack of transparency surrounding sex and the 51 percent of Latinas that will become pregnant before the age of 21, and one-fourth (26 percent) of Hispanic females that will be mothers by the time they reach age 19. Now, luckily for me I’ve never been pregnant. If I had, I probably would not find myself among the 32 percent of Latinos that have attained some level of a college education.

In summary…easier access to  birth control is a fantastic stride, but bilingual sex education that extends beyond abstinence is vital in sustaining any progress we make. Also, Cosmo Magazine does not get enough credit. Yes, they preach a very nasty shade of lipstick feminism and the sex tips are often ill-advised…but they taught me how to use a condom 🙂