Tag Archives: media

Men Getting Down & Dirty

9 Dec

Stay-at-Home-Dad-01Have you ever noticed during paper towel commercials, the smiling mother cleans up the spilled juice? Or what about when the wife sprays Mr. Clean on the mud that was tracked in by the dog? Well an article from the Wall Street Journal discusses a change to the way household chores are marketed. The new target audience is the male viewers of these advertisements. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the amount of time a man spends cleaning the house has increased. This article is hopeful that the media is realizing women are not longer the designated “housewives.” I think women will enjoy this marketing towards the new improved “househusband.”

Defined by Marriage

9 Dec

A woman keeping her last name is not radical but makes a statement of being true to herself.

signature(1)“A wife should no more take her husbands name than he should hers. My name is my identity and must not be lost.” Lucy Stone was the first woman in the United States to refuse to take her husband’s last name. Although her idea was in the 1800s, American women have not come a long way since then.

A person’s name is not only their label, but it defines who they are. The value of a person’s name is respected in the majority of cultures. In China, parents hope for a baby boy in order to carry on the family’s name. As for India they treasure their names in respect of their ancestors. Unfortunately American society disregards a woman’s name.

Women’s identity is determined not by her accomplishments or career but she is defined by marriage. Once she makes the decision to utter the words “I do,” she is no longer referred to as her own person, but her husband defines her.

Are Women in the Media Only Portrayed As Sex Icons?

6 Dec

We’ve discussed in class on numerous occasions the differences in how men and women are portrayed in the media. This article discusses a couple of studies that point out how women are more likely to be portrayed as “sex icons” versus anything else.The article also discusses MissRepresentation and how it is good at pointing out the sexist media to women who may not have noticed.

“The media is a powerful instrument of change and change can only occur once we are able to see the type of force this tool has cast on society. It’s up to us women to use the force of media to influence positive change and correct the representation of women.”

Beauty. Drugs. Death.

27 Nov

Maria Susana Flores Gamez, beauty queen, was competing for Miss Mexico but her fight fell short when her body was found in the middle of a drug war. Flores Gamez was enrolled in a local college and had been modeling and completing pageants for three years. According to the Associated Press beauty queens and Mexico’s violence involving drugs is a common trend, and this is the third instance. “Miss Bala” was arrested for drug acts that were forced on her by gang members.  While in 2011 former Miss Sinaloa Laura Zuniga was arrested for suspicion of drugs and weapon infringements.

Javier Valdez is an author of book “Miss Narco” which evaluates the recent trend for young women in Mexico. Valdez says, “It is a question of privilege, power, money, but also a question of need,” said Valdez. “For a lot of these young women, it is easy to get involved with organized crime, in a country that doesn’t offer many opportunities for young people.”

Even young women who are attempting to head down the proper path seem to get held up with major obstacles: drug, violence and war. How can these women better their lives if they do not have opportunities after they win pageants and earn a college degree? These women attempt to use all the resources they can to further themselves from their environment, but it seems to be a pattern that they will fail.

Judged on Character

14 Nov

In the 21st century, your life is under a microscope. Your deepest thoughts are posted on Twitter. An iPhone can pin point your direct location. Your face is splashed on the largest social network, Facebook, for the world to see. So I was not surprised that a political figure’s scandal was exposed this weekend.

David H. Petraeus is a well-respected military figure and never fell short when it came to his job, yet his marriage was another story. Petraeus was a four-star general and a heavily involved leader in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He was also appointed by President Obama to be the director of Central Intelligence Agency. Regardless of his career once his affair was revealed he resigned.

There has been a stir of conversation to whether a public figure’s personal life should affect their job. Personally, if you become a public figure whether you are a general or a talk show host, you are a role model. Your actions regardless if they are in front of a camera or in a closed off room should be ethical. I think resigning was the best action because your character should be reflected in both your public and personal life.

Playing Unfair

31 Oct

      I watched the film “Playing Unfair – The Media Image of the Female Athlete” reflects on how the media portrays female athletes as weak, subordinate and sex symbols. Women athletes were not given the opportunity to be equals until the passing of Title IX. The law would not allow anyone to be rejected in participating in sports based off gender. Although the passing of Title IX legally granted equality to female athletes, there are still social boundaries to climb over.

The coverage women received differed from men. When sports announcers would say the name of athletes they address women by their first name and men by their last name. Once the video made this claim I realized I had noticed this detail before. When watching the Olympics this summer, my favorite sport to watch was tennis. I noticed when the announcer was covering Andy Roddick’s game he or she would refer to him as Roddick. However, when Serena Williams was playing her opponent they would refer to her as Serena.

“Playing Unfair” opened my eyes to how the media molds female athletes into sex symbols. The film would compare images of swimsuit models to well-known women athletes. The women had similar poses as well as wearing little clothing. The athletes would claim they wanted to show off their body because they were proud of how fit they were or it made them feel empowered. But the experts in the film made an excellent point; these women are role models to girls and young athletes should not think the only way to feel empowered is to pose half naked.

Coulter and the “R” word

25 Oct

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After the foreign policy debate Ann Coulter tweeted her support for Romney being nice to “the retard” referring to Obama. Not only does this prove that women can be just as ignorant as men, it clearly shows the turn politics has taken in recent years. I can’t imagine anyone saying something like this about the President 10-15 years ago. She has gotten a lot of backlash for her comments from reporters, the Special Olympics, and parents of children with special needs.

 

As someone in a position to be a role model for young women, she did a very poor job at setting a positive example. It’s become common knowledge that using a word like that is completely inappropriate and someone in a position to show a strong, independent woman just threw all her respect out the window.

Sexism in Mad Men

4 Sep

This is my favorite show, but it centers around the misogynistic 1960s culture. Why is the show so popular if it highlights an era of sexism and racism? This article explores the idea that the negative aspects may be so enticing because of the romantic way they are portrayed.